Brew At The Zoo

Yes, the band’s name is “Screaming Broccoli.”

Dagmar and I went to the Bronx Zoo’s “Brew at the Zoo” event last Friday. We had a lot of fun tasting different beers and enjoying a surprisingly pleasant evening compared to the weather we’ve had lately.

The gates open at six, and most of the exhibits were already closed, so we didn’t get a chance to see many of the animals. I didn’t get many photos, and most of them aren’t very good. The butterfly house was still open though, and I got a few shots there. Unfortunately, I’m not very good with an iPhone camera.

Even with the exhibits closed, the zoo is a beautiful place to walk around while sampling different beers, hard sodas, and ciders. The zoo also featured a better assortment of food trucks than the last time, and I was able to get my favorite Mexican dish: chorizo.

Here are a few pictures. I’ll do better next time.

 

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Jeff Corey’s Appearance on Babylon 5

Babylon 5 drew from many places for its guest stars. Genre stalwarts like Michael Ansara and Brad Dourif. TV regulars like William Sanderson, Melissa Gilbert, and Erica Gimpel. Special guest stars like Michael York and Robert Englund. Even fresh new faces like Bryan Cranston.

But one of my favorite appearances, even though it was barely a cup of tea in length, was by Jeff Corey. You might know him from Little Big Man, where he gave an incredible performance as Will Bill Hickok.

Jeff Corey as Wild Bill Hickok
Jeff Corey as Wild Bill Hickok
A creepy Jeff Corey in Conan the Destroyer.

Or maybe from Conan the Destroyer as the creepy Grand Vizier.
Or maybe you recognize his voice as Silvermane in the 90’s Spider-Man cartoons. Or the sheriff in Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. Or Tom Chaney (the main villain) in True Grit Or from one of the 100s of roles he played on TV, such as in the original Star Trek or The Outer Limits. He was everywhere, and he tended to be memorable.

His turn on Babylon 5 is a real treat. Without revealing any critical spoilers, he plays a mysterious man that wants something from a skeptical Captain Sheridan (Bruce “Scarecrow” Boxleitner,) and is delightfully strange and oddly persuasive. It’s a great piece of writing, where the series creator, J. Michael Straczynski┬ástarts revealing what has really been going on for three seasons with some great dialogue and vivid imagery.

I have a clip with just enough to give you a taste without revealing too much.

Spider-Man Meets The Prankster!

Spider-Man showed up on the Electric Company in 1974, when I was ten years old. I was already a dedicated PBS viewer when the show appeared a few years earlier, and a live action Spider-Man, even if he was in rather corny shorts like above and never spoke, was a must watch.

There was also an Electric Company magazine that I was a big fan of too. I remember it have single-page origin stories for Marvel superheroes for a year or so. Heady stuff for ten-year-old.

And yes, that is Morgan Freeman.

The Bees’ Happy Ending

I posted about Bees twice on Tuesday.

While I was taking my photos from across the street, I saw someone on the roof with the beekeepers and what looked like a professional camera.

Turns out, he was from Reuters news. Here is a slideshow. (Unfortuntely there’s no way to embed it.)

The bees were relocated to a hive in Bryant Park, which is great news. They should feel right at home only a couple of blocks away.

 

 

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